The Fall Of Troy @ Sound Control

The Fall Of Troy @ Sound Control

Words & photos: Frederick Apps

The lead singer of Terrible Love from London performed their entire set immersed in the audience in Sound Control’s middle bar and thank god he did. As photographer tonight, I was able to capture him under the fire escape lights, with a blackened stage cloaking the rest of the band in darkness. He was very athletic and had a notion of the Future Islands vocalist Samuel T Herring about him, but with a much harder hitting edge in his delivery. Technically a good band with a message to spread about a fat sounding semi prog/rock revival, they were certainly different to Fall Of Troy and it helped diversify the evening.

In drumming terms it wasn’t all double bass drum beats and relaying drum rolls, which usually amounts to nothing when played in the wrong place. This was a more reserved performance, with no disappearing up the darker end of ones torso for the sake of playing aggressively, but an attacking rock group with lots of changes from verse to chorus that kept things entertaining.  

As for Tiny Moving Parts who followed, I don’t think the name gives justice to a great band with exciting prospects. As usual, the American bands never fail technically and this outfit wasn’t any different. The Minnesota act helped us to achieve a sense of narrative with their set through some strong song writing. You could actually sing along within the first verse and chorus of most songs, but they also had a power about them which identified their themes and personality, striking the balance between accessible melodies and a forceful thump. The lead singer was strong in character, always smiling to the audience which gave over a great sense of self-worth and enjoyment about what they were bringing to us. This band is certainly on the up and there is no dodging around.

Fall OF Troy are no strangers to the stage and the venue neither justified them or gave the band the strength of size in the small room. This band deserves bigger. Charging through their set with a grace and power, there was no shortage in dynamic variety – in particular for drummer Andrew Forsman for whom you would need a small dictionary to ably describe the essences of his playing.

They treated the crowd to a distinct performance thanks to their progressive and lively sound. Fronted by a strong personality in lead singer/guitarist Thomas Erak, they provide lots of lovely expression and sudden anger mixed with posturing more akin to of those from the school of dance and ballet up the road from here.

It was technical and drew the crowd in. For those of you who yearn for musicality, powerful song writing and a-guts-on-the-floor abrasiveness in music then this is the kind of band which can tick all those boxes. Go see them for yourself so that you can share the belief with them. Invention is still out there.

Casey @ FAC251

Casey @ FAC251

Epica - The Holographic Principle

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