Promethium and Prognosis at The Alma

Promethium and Prognosis at The Alma

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Words: Phil Weller/Anthony Firmin | Photos: Anthony Firmin

Some bands take themselves far too seriously, not Thrashatouille though who enter the stage dressed as chefs and go on to serve a succulent platter of meaty metal tunes about brain freeze and pie – well, Bolton is close to Wigan so why not?!  Another song is about rotten beef that has grown it’s own eyes and personality, a creature that has gone on to become the bands mascot.  Considering the ingredients for the band only came together in December and they have already been in the recording studio, the band are cooking on gas.  We were whisked away with their metal taste sensation – can we have a second helping, please?

Wigan quarter Sacrament follow up with a much more sinisterly serious performance. They eschew the brute force aggression of many of metal's biggest names. From the galloping acceleration of Metallica, and too a grunting vocal performance which strides the line between ...And Justice era and Black Album era Hetfield, to a healthy dose of Iron Maiden's epic reaching sound. They play loud and with a crunching tightness that works to great effect, the audience by this point well lubricated and well up for a party. Their sound is familiar and punchy, aggressive but not overly abrasive and so they come across as fun as they are heavy.

Following their win of the Northampton Mammothfest competition back in March and a subsequent well needed five week break, Prognosis return to the stage at The Alma to a rammed room who were eager to lap up their brand of progressive metal.  From the off the band hit the ground running with a spellbinding display of class musicianship.  Void was especially well appreciated by the crowd who begged the band back for an encore but time sadly didn’t allow it.

With a recently released album in tow, Enemies of War their third in total, by now Lancastrian metallers Promethium have a wealth of songs to draw upon. Much like Sacrament before them, the band's DNA is made up largely of classic metsl bands. Some riffs stomp and growl while others whip up a storm with pace and ferocity, frontman Steve Graham all the while a forceful presence centre stage. Sure, detractors and cynics could bemoan the band's supposed metallic conservatism for there is nothing new, brave and daring about their songs, but those people are missing the point. These are the kind of bands, the kinds of face contorting riffs and punch-the-air choruses that made us fall in love with metal in the first place. They're music is upfront and honest, it's respectful of and pays homeage to the genre's rich lineage and they have a whale of a time doing so. That infects the crowd, as it is clear to see from the warm response they get. They round off a great night of daft, adventerous and classic metal sounds perfect for a Friday night.

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