Psycroptic & Aversions Crown @ Rebellion

Psycroptic & Aversions Crown @ Rebellion

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Deathly Aussies team up to give Rebellion a pounding

Words: Phil Weller

Whipping up a frenzy of tempestuous, violent dad dancing from those at the front, Within Destruction's set is all about brutality and barbarism. Their stuttering song structures focus more on impact that cohesion, with closing track D E A TH W I S H, from their 2018 of the same name offering no quarter but ample opportunity for the Slovenian deathcore act to flex their muscles.

Aversions Crown swiftly follow and work hard to refill and reanimate the dwindling crowd that was there to witness the opening bars of their set; the rest of the punters either at the bar or in the smoking area. Once that's achieved their grunting technicality thrives. Both guitarists predominantly operate within their own flanks, one dishing out crunching eight string rhythms, the other texturising their aggression with tense but ultimately spacious and melodious lead lines that broaden their sound, making it more than just heavy. But it is when they unite that they really impress. The gravity of their triple pronged breakdowns, with the bass further fattening the low end, makes for an impressive hammer blow sound and one atop which Mark Poida's fierce growls command your attention. On Hollow Planet there is room for mysterious melodies to slither between their bombarding tech-death and, for a band cemented well within their niche, they do so with prestige.

Energy, power and dizzying riffs are Psycroptic's game and the Tasmanian four piece rifle through their catalogue of material at breakneck speed. The veins in vocalist Jason Peppiatt's neck look set to burst as he bellows the fist-pumping chorus of Frozen Gaze, a song which marries the likes of Opeth and Necrophagist with Carcass fuelled riffwork and grooves. There's an insatiable swing to their songs, their ferocity matched with harmony and a feel that opens up their sound and sucks you in. Directive is a prime example, it's intro riff punchdrunk and spinning with crazy fretboard runs; guitarist Joe Haley stock still throughout except his perpetually blurred fingers, the song another chance for the band to parade their intelligent yet destructive aesthetic.

While much of their 60 minute blitzing understandably focuses on last year's exceptional record, As The Kingdom Drowns, older cuts like Ob(Servant) and Echoes To Come arrive armed with filthy, face contorting riffs and are executed with a sadistic glee. Their thrash leanings keep things fun, their aggression stands toe to toe with their Aussie counterparts but their progressive ambition takes them to higher plains, their riffs journeying greater, more detailed distances that sees them steal the night.

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