Instrumental Music That Journeys Through Your Mind

Instrumental Music That Journeys Through Your Mind

Telepathy kick off their UK tour with a captivating performance at Rebellion

 Words: Phil Weller | Photos: Anthony Firmin

Instrumental music, the general consensus seems to concede, lives on the fringes of popular music. Without a killer vocalist, how can a band be entertaining? It’s just not the same. That however, is a belief that Telepathy have, time and time again, smashed to pieces. Tonight at Rebellion is no different. Sure, the turnout isn’t astounding, but there are more contributing factors than just the quality of their music at play here. But as soon as the first notes trickled out of the speakers, the entire room was arrested and in awe.

Talking with Archetype prior to their show, it is clear they are not only band-mates but also close friends who share a deep bond in music.  A bond that permeates the pieces they loviingly craft so absolutely, each instinctively knowing what the other is thinking; a bond, a closeness that makes this performance incredibly tight and a joy to watch, to listen to and to absorb.

In Zaum, they have some intriguing tour mates. The experimental doom duo blend both the precipitous peaks and the downtrodden troughs of doom metal together with the spiritual, effects-drenched meditations of Middle Eastern sounds. Candles flicker on the stage and the lighting is low, coating the band in blood red. It creates an atmosphere that is highly unique and when their crescendos come knocking from out of the dark, you sure as hell notice them.

Telepathy then responded with a predictable fiery performance. There is a spectral mist that seems to coat this band whenever they play and as they grind out their skittish and feral rhythms here tonight you’re left to watch their silhouettes prowl the stage. Saccade is like going 12 rounds with Mike Tyson while your Snoop Dogg high – it’s aggressive and unrelenting and you just stand there, not quite on this planet, accepting the beating. Smoke From Distant Fires generates its own pathetic fallacy, a bleak and thick smog choking the song while Echo Of Souls, which includes a brief but virile vocal performance from bassist Teddy-James Driscoll, sounds like a an exorcism.

They step off the stage and reality suddenly begins spinning again. You come back to earth, satisfied. Until next time.  

 

 

Preview: The Standard Lamps

Preview: The Standard Lamps

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Weirds - Swarmculture